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ARCHITECTURE OF CHANGE

Void Art Centre

ASSEMBLE I Andreas Kindler von Knobloch I Tom Watt I Tanad Williams I Amanda Moström

26 May – july 1

ASSEMBLE - Void Derry
ASSEMBLE – Void Derry

‘Architecture of Change’ explores urban ecology and notions of play through sculpture, installation, film, talks, and workshops. As a city, Derry has a unique history, demonstrated through its archaeological sites. In more recent times it has shifted from being a mercantile, industrial city to its present ‘critical’ phase. It has the potential to be something other than the homogenous cities which have become the norm throughout the globalised world where public space becomes restricted and movement through the city becomes choreographed through design and function. Retaining the significant character of the city is important to maintaining the sense of place. What we are exploring is the Derry ‘city of the future’ and how that is imagined through ideas of play, green spaces, urban design and architecture.

ASSEMBLE - Void Derry
ASSEMBLE – Void Derry

Void are delighted to welcome ASSEMBLE as part of this exhibition – whose working practice seeks to address the typical disconnection between the public, and the process, by which places are made. ASSEMBLE will be exhibit a filmic work that explores the wider conversation around the importance of play within an urban context. ASSEMBLEchampion a working practice that is interdependent and collaborative, seeking to actively involve the public as participant and collaborator in the realisation of their work. Andreas Von Knobloch, Tanad Williams and Tom Watt will work in collaboration to produce a site-specific installation for the gallery responding to the architecture and design of the Derry city walls, disused military sites, and the structure of Grianan of Aileach Fort. Amanda Moström’s work is centred on notions of play and the boundaries around the types of responses that art engenders in its audiences. Play can be subversive and potentially liberating, creating new social dynamics both within the gallery space but more importantly within the urban sphere.

 

The speed with which we witness the transformation of our urban environments is a response to the increasingly urbanised world economy. The city has always had a distinctive role as a centre of business, labour and consumption patterns but it is also a point of social exchange and play.

 

ASSEMBLE

 

Assemble are a collective based in London who work across the fields of art, architecture and design. They began working together in 2010 and are comprised of 18 members. Assemble’s working practice seeks to address the typical disconnection between the public and the process by which places are made. Assemble champion a working practice that is interdependent and collaborative, seeking to actively involve the public as both participant and collaborator in the on-going realisation of the work.

 

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ASSEMBLE - Void Derry
ASSEMBLE – Void Derry

Andreas von Knobloch I Tom Watt I Tanad Williams – Collective Bio

 

Andreas Tanad and Tom, are three visual artists currently based in Dublin and Scotland. Since graduating from the sculpture department of NCAD in 2011-2012, they have developed their individual practice while also working collaboratively on a variety of different projects. Their collaborations are informed by an interest in social space, philosophy, landscape, materiality and architecture. Their collaborative sculptures are result of experimental exchange and are often constructed to perform in multi-dimensional ways – occupying a position between aesthetic object/ structure, the fit-for-purpose and elements of pragmatic usefulness. Their practice presents an ambitious interrogation of objects, environments and uses. Working with everyday or commonplace materials lends the works a familiarity while allowing them the freedom to be re- examined in a new and unfamiliar context. This method often results in work whose emphasis is on its production values, be they self-made or factory finished and a focus on the work’s overall coherent composition.

 

Andreas Kindler von Knobloch

Andreas Kindler von Knobloch is currently based in Dublin. His multidisciplinary practice is focused on ideas of collectivity and participation through the creation of structures and situations that question our material and social relations. Working in a variety of materials his work often seeks to help out or solve a perceived need, in a way that feels both utopian and pragmatic.

Tom Watt

Tom Watt is currently based in Hopeman in Northern Scotland. His practice deals with altering the existing architecture of a space or temporarily assigning it a new function. He excavates spaces that are closed off from regular usage and lie outside of the frame of visible functionality. His interests lie in the gap that exists between our understanding of the space that we dwell in and these other spaces, which co-exist alongside us. Watt plays with uncovering these spaces, and their properties of silence and invisibility, re-purposing them through actions and built extensions.

Tanad Williams

Tanad Williams currently based in Dublin. Works with philosophically engaged objects, dialogues and texts. Rooted in academic research and linguistic investigation, the final object is constructed so as to represent both its material reality and its theoretical conception. He is a multidisciplinary artist working with performance, texts, objects both in his solo practice and his collaborative projects.

ASSEMBLE - Void Derry
ASSEMBLE – Void Derry

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Amanda Moström

ASSEMBLE - Void Derry
ASSEMBLE – Void Derry

Amanda Moström was born in Umeå and now lives in London. She graduated Fine Art Sculpture from City and Guilds in 2016. Recent shows include ‘Doing it in the park, doing it after dark’ at Castor Projects, ‘Hopp och Lek’, a collaborative project with Lucas Dupuy at The Kennington Residency. She has exhibited in ‘Bloomberg New Contempories’ 2017/2018 at Block 336 in London, before showing at The Baltic 39 in Newcastle.

ASSEMBLE - Void Derry
ASSEMBLE – Void Derry

Her work generally tries to be read as a tool for play or function of some sort. She plays with the use and values of both experiences and materials. Amanda enjoys making things that you can touch and she is always trying to work with and beyond an often static gallery space, to create encounters, and encourage mischief.She enjoys collaboration and addressing issues of authorship to challenge hierarchical norms.

ASSEMBLE - Void Derry
ASSEMBLE – Void Derry

Amanda often wants there to be a clear reference to a public space and to encourage the same kind of familiarity in how people react to, move around, and use such public spaces. In this way the gallery space can function – not just as a quiet, contemplative space – but active, messy and action-filled.

 

BETWEEN OBJECTS IN THE WAKING WORLD ROSA BARBA

Void Art Centre

24 March 12 May

Rosa Barba - Void Derry
Rosa Barba – Void Derry

Rosa Barba’s work situates itself within the realm of film and expands into sculptural forms through the exploration of the physicality of film itself and how that plays with light and spatiality. For this exhibition ‘between objects in the waking world’ she is exhibiting filmic works that situate themselves between experimental documentary and fictional narratives. Her films are located within specific geographic landscapes, whether manmade or natural often times desolate locations not conducive to human habitation. In saying that there is ‘psychogeographical’ element to these works through her study of the specific effect of the geographical environment on the behaviour and emotions of individuals; this is demonstrated in her films ‘Outwardly from Earth’s Center’ (2007) and ‘Disseminate and Hold’ (2016). Barba’s film works are fictions based within fiction, engaging with the tropes of documentary film making to create this sense of the real and to immerse the viewer in multi layered narratives. She is also engaged in this idea of film as a form of writing as can be seen in her piece ‘Optic Ocean’ (2011) a printed film script exhibited alongside ‘Somnium’ (2011).

Rosa Barba - Void Derry
Rosa Barba – Void Derry

‘Optic Ocean’ consists of a large, untreated canvas on which a text is printed in a double silkscreen print in red and cyan, the spotlight illuminates the text which gives the text a sense of movement which plays with the viewer’s vision. The text quotes a film script based on the first science-fiction narrative entitled ‘Somnium’, envisaged by the philosopher and optician Johannes Kepler – in which he demonstrated a parallelism.  ‘Somnium’ is directly connected to ‘Optic Ocean’, as the text is the film script influenced by the short story written by Kepler that was published posthumously in 1634. Borrowing Kepler’s title in homage, she has drawn upon both his tale and, his remarkable achievement in establishing a new ontology of vision. The story describes how the earth is viewed from the lunar surface, and imagines the way of life of the inhabitants of the moon and its climatic conditions. In the film we see scenes of a desolate industrial port location as the narrator describes the constant construction of this new landscape. The location is in Rotterdam, a future harbor that will be in use by 2030, claimed to be the largest land reclamation project in the world.  The minimal soundtrack by Jan St. Werner alongside the multiple narrations creates a surreal storyline that merges fact and fiction.

Rosa Barba - Void Derry
Rosa Barba – Void Derry

‘Outwardly from Earth’s Center’ is based on a fictional society that inhabits an island that is unstable and is drifting toward the North Pole. The narration of the film by experts lends weight to the situation; long aerial shots pan the landscape highlighting its seclusion. In order for the society to survive they must work collectively to save their piece of land. Social cohesion is the over arching sentiment of the piece as well as highlighting the human condition of vulnerability in an unstable environment. Continuing her exploration of landscape ‘Disseminate and Hold’ is sited in the city landscape of São Paulo, a sprawling metropolis the film centres on an elevated highway that runs through the city. These highways were often associated with utopian visions of the future and an economic vibrancy. In the film we see a highway occupied by people and devoid of cars as the road is open only to pedestrians and cyclists on weekends and during the week on evenings. The road is named after the Minhocão (animal), a quasi-fictitious earthworm-like creature. Barba is interested in the relationship between the city, its architectural history and its politics.  Returning to this notion that the environment of the city can have an emotional effect on the people albeit it a subconscious effect. Similarly, Tony Smith famously described an experience on the New Jersey Turnpike; “The road and much of the landscape was artificial,” he said, “and yet it couldn’t be called a work of art. On the other hand, it did something for me that art had never done. At first I didn’t know what it was, but its effect was to liberate me from many of the views I had about art. It seemed that there had been a reality there that had not had any expression in art.” That reality could not be described, Smith said; it was something one had to “experience.”

Rosa Barba - Void Derry
Rosa Barba – Void Derry

Barba’s observational technique permits us to be somewhat removed but also present in these landscapes. In each of these films there is a meta narrative that connects them, the sense that all that is present becomes the future’s past, archaeological remnants of times past.

Rosa Barba - Void Derry
Rosa Barba – Void Derry

Rosa Barba’s work is a subtle interrogation into and co-option of industrial cinema-as- subject, via various kinds of what might be understood as “stagings”—of “the local,” the non-actor, gesture, genre, information, expertise and authority, the mundane—and removals from a social realism within which they were observed, and which qualifies them as components of the work, to be framed, redesigned, represented. The effect of which her work contests and recasts truth and fiction, myth and reality, metaphor and material to a disorientating degree, which ultimately extends into a conceptual practice.” (Ian White)

Her work has been exhibited at institutions and biennials worldwide. Most recently, she has had solo exhibitions at Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Palacio de Cristal, Madrid (2017); HangarBicocca, Milan (2017); Vienna Secession (2017); Malmö Konsthall (2017); CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France (2016-2017); Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt (2016); Albertinum, Dresden (2015), and at the MIT List

Visual Arts Center, Cambridge MA (2015).

Barba’s work is part of numerous public collections and has been widely published, most recently, in the monographic books Rosa Barba: From Source to Poem (2017; published by Hatje Cantz) and Rosa Barba: The Color Out of Space (2016; published by MIT List Visual Arts Center/Dancing Foxes). Rosa Barba was awarded various prizes, amongst others thePIAC, International Prize for Contemporary Art, by the Prince Pierre de Monaco Foundation (2016).

 

Every Day Words Disappear Johan Grimonprez

Void Art Centre

3 February – 10 March

Johan Grimonprez - Void Derry
Johan Grimonprez – Void Derry

Johan Grimonprez’s critically acclaimed work dances on the borders of practice and theory, art and cinema, documentary and fiction, demanding a double take on the part of the viewer. Informed by an archeology of present-day media, his work seeks out the tension between the intimate and the bigger picture of globalisation. It questions our contemporary sublime, one framed by a fear industry that has infected political and social dialogue. By suggesting new narratives through which to tell a story, his work emphasises a multiplicity of realities.

Johan Grimonprez - Void Derry
Johan Grimonprez – Void Derry

 

The exhibition takes its title from the film ‘Every Day Words Disappear’ (2016). In 1515 Machiavelli stated that it would be better for the Prince to be feared, than loved. Some 500 years later, Michael Hardt, political philosopher and co-author of ‘Empire, Multitude and Commonwealth’, asks in this film what it would mean to base a political system on love, rather than on fear.  In the dystopian city-state ‘Alphaville’, of Godard’s eponymous film, all words and concepts relating to the idea of love and affection have been banned. When actress Anna Karina tries to express her feelings, she has to reinvent the words, for the concept of love is foreign to her. Like the protagonist in ‘Alphaville’, Hardt suggests that we need to redefine the tools to act politically together. Hardt embarks on a journey to identify the transformative powers of the ongoing struggle to re-invent democracy. Within this struggle he understands “the commons” as an antidote against a society run by fear; an inspiration for a paradigm that is based on dialogue and cooperation.

Johan Grimonprez - Void Derry
Johan Grimonprez – Void Derry

 

How can we transform a society that is increasingly defined by a permanent state of war and cultivated by an industry of fear? How can we realise the paradigm shift necessary to move away from a reality that depends on the exploitation of people and the cult of privatising public resources? Hardt looks for an answer in what he calls “the commons”, by which he refers not only to natural resources, but also to the languages we create and the relationships we conceive together.

Johan Grimonprez - Void Derry
Johan Grimonprez – Void Derry

 

The exhibition follows the trajectory of Grimponprez’s practice from his seminal work ‘dial H-I-S-T-O-R-Y’ (1997), which documented the history of plane hijacking from the late 1960s to the 1990s, set against the backdrop depicting a dialogue between a terrorist and a novelist, where the latter contends that the terrorist or bomb-maker has taken over the writer’s territory as he is able to play the media more succinctly. This piece was made prior to 9/11 that transformed geopolitics, to his most recent works, ‘Blue Orchids’ (2017)  and ‘Raymond Tallis, On Tickling’ (2017); two new films. This will be the first presentation of these films – as well as ‘What I Will’ – in Northern Ireland and the UK.

In ‘Blue Orchids’, Grimonprez creates a portrait diptych of two experts on opposite sides of the same issue – the global arms trade. The stories of Chris Hedges, the former war correspondent of The New York Times, and Riccardo Privitera, a former arms & equipment dealer of Talisman Europe Ltd (now dissolved), provide an unusual and disturbing context for shocking revelations about the industry of war. The UK’s arms industry makes about 20% of arms exported globally. Many of the UK customers have questionable human rights records and there are concerns that exported weapons are used for repression, or against military targets, (such as presently sent to Saudi-Arabia to bomb Yemen). This film has a local resonance since one of the world’s leading arms manufacturers was once based in Derry. In 2010, anti-war activists occupied their offices, protesting their activities, which resulted in the company’s decision to close their offices; demonstrating the power of collective resistance.

‘Blue Orchids’ will be immediately followed by ‘Raymond Tallis, On Tickling’. In this short film philosopher/neurologist Raymond Tallis argues that consciousness is not an internal construct, but rather relational. Through the intriguing idea that humans are physically unable to tickle themselves (despite applying the exact same stimulus to the skin as another person would), Tallis explores the philosophical notion that we become ourselves only through dialogue with others.

‘What I Will’ (2013) is a poignant poem written and narrated by Palestinian-American Suheir Hammad. The flashing footage of military parades and anti-aircraft guns provide the backdrop to her powerful voice, in a time when we have seen unprecedented numbers of people protesting against war this is a valiant protest poem.

Grimonprez’s works provides us with the tools to deconstruct and be critical of the mass media, the State, and the narrative that is driven through different mediums. We are living in complex times; politics are entering the realm of the surreal, the media landscape is totally transformed and with the acceleration of information we need to question what becomes normalised through the landscape of images that we absorb.

The Winter Seris

Void Art Centre

Keef Winter | Anita Delaney| Sonia Shiel

‘Tax Return’ – A Performance by

Keef Winter

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Image credit, ‘Ed Jansen, West Gallery, The Hague 2016’
Title ‘Admin Day’
Keef Winter

In VOID Gallery Winter will investigate the sonic properties of a filing cabinet using contact mics, effects pedals and a sledgehammer.

N. Irish artist Keef Winter lives and works in London. He combines his interests in art and architecture using sculpture, installation, sound and performance. He completed a PhD in 2013 entitled ‘The Handyman Aesthetic’ at Ulster University. Winter’s studio process generates abstract apparatus that reference urban dissonance and reflect on cultish practices. He has a live act called ‘Handyman’ that mixes electronics, sounds of sheet steel, vocal samples and drumming.

His recent exhibitions include: ‘Can’t Help It’ (solo) at Black Tower Projects, London 2017; ‘Pre-Fix’, Unofficial Northern Ireland Pavilion, Sella Del Giardini, Venice 2017; ‘Swimming with Sharks’ (solo), Galeria Breve, Mexico City 2017; ‘On Becoming Fluid’, Hardwick Gallery, Cheltenham 2017; ‘Wysing Polyphonic’, Wysing Arts Centre, Cambridge 2016; ‘Sticky Enough’, Chalton Gallery, London 2016; ’Salon Sebastian Monteux’, Glasgow International 2016; ‘Deep Inside’ (solo), Galeria Breve, Mexico City 2016; FUSO & Carpe Diem, Lisbon 2015; ‘Post-Terminal & Ex-Ultimate’, West, Den Haag 2016; ‘Center Point’ (solo), House of St. Barnabas, London 2015; ‘Let’s build our own tomb’, Matt’s Gallery, London 2015; ‘Neutral’,TULCA Festival of Visual Art, Galway 2014; ‘London Dust’, Chandelier Projects, London 2014; ‘Stone Dreams’ ORGY PARK, New York 2014.

Upcoming presentations in 2018 include Litost Gallery, Prague; Sirius Art Centre, Cork and Galeria Breve, Mexico City.

‘The Cusp of Your Credenza’ & ‘Tissue’ Film Screenings by

Anita Delaney

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The Cusp of Your Credenza (2015):

HD video and stereo audio, duration 10 minutes 27 seconds

The Cusp of Your Credenza is a wandering speculation through various material encounters. A woman presents a number of scenarios that involve the ingestion or ejection of substances. From toenails to statuary, muffins to monuments, The Cusp of Your Credenza wonders how we place ourselves bodily in a material world.

 

 

 

Sonia Shiel

‘Dead Her’ (2018)

sonia-shiel-w356h238

Image Credit:
Courtesy of the Artist
Sonia Shiel
Still from Dead Her,  2018 

Sonia Shiel is a Dublin born visual artist, whose works synthesise object, image and sound in performative and immersive installations. At Void, Shiel will premiere Dead Her, a narrated visual presentation, written, directed and performed by the artist. Dead Her is one of a number of recent narrative works that will feature in her new book of short stories each exploring the pursuit of creative agency, – or living – with and without art. It will be published in 2018, by UCD‘s Parity Studios Press.

Shiel has had exhibitions at The Crawford Art Gallery, Cork; the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; the Lewis Glucksman Gallery, Cork; ISCPNew York; Temple Bar Gallery and Studios, Dublin; Kulturbunker, Frankfurt; Rua Red, Dublin; the Butler Gallery, Kilkenny and the RHA Gallery I and II, among many others. Recent performances and readings include Treeline, TBGS, Artbox and the NCAD Gallery. She has been the recipient of many awards, and international residencies, with the support of the Arts Council and Culture Ireland, and has completed recent fellowships at Fordham Law School, New York and the School of English, Drama and Film at UCD.

Where History Begins

Void Art Centre

Kader Attia | Duncan Campbell | Ali Cherri | Christodoulos Panayiotou

28 October – 16 December

Where History Begins, Void Derry
Where History Begins, Void Derry

Where History Begins, explores the complex relationship between material culture and historical truth. The development of archaeology in the early 19th century is closely associated with the categorisation of material culture, preoccupied with the construction of a timeline through which artefacts determine the culture of a society in a space and time. These materials have become indexes within the field of research and when placed within a museum context have become valuable evidence or artefacts evoking a history. This interest in history or preservation has been traced back by historians to ancient art collections that predate the museum at the end of the third century B.C. The museum as collector or preserver of culture has become a contested site for artefacts. The collection of these pieces is often associated with the colonial project, the construction of the Nation State and a symbol of capitalism.

Where History Begins, Void Derry
Where History Begins, Void Derry

The nature of culture is to be dynamic and constantly shifting, with a multiplicity of histories. This exhibition questions how we construct historical narratives, how there is no one historical truth, and in what way histories have been constructed through the colonial project and particular ideological contexts. The writer Édouard Glissant observed that museums have become more like continents and that they should be more like an ‘archipelago’, he called for a global dialogue that does not erase local cultures but finds the commonality in difference.

Where History Begins, Void Derry
Where History Begins, Void Derry

 

Artefacts that demonstrate the complex history of Derry City and its surrounding area, from the early Neolithic period (c.4000 – 3500 BC) to the Ulster plantation period of the 17th century are exhibited with national and international contemporary artists revealing comparative histories with other cultures. The artists address the difficult relationship between destruction, conservation, appropriation and collective memory.

Where History Begins, Void Derry
Where History Begins, Void Derry

Ali Cherri’s film work Petrified (2015) questions the fetishisation of historical artefacts, by looking at the value we place on provenance and authenticity. The current prevalence of looting and the trafficking of artefacts, especially in conflict zones in the Middle East, open a timely debate on the reconstruction and restoration of demolished heritage. How does this alter the notion of authenticity? What historical traces are deemed valuable and why? Filmed between Sharjah’s Arabian Wildlife Centre and an excavation site in Northern Sudan, Petrified takes a journey into the life of dead objects.

Where History Begins, Void Derry
Where History Begins, Void Derry

Christodoulos Panayiotou, Real Fakes (2015) questions this notion of authenticity, and what becomes part of the historical lexicon. The work is made from stones that were discarded from archaeological excavations in Cyprus; they become ready mades, sculptures that are formed through a process of creation and destruction. Within the act of digging in archaeology there is the act of revealing and hiding, as often times the site is covered over once excavated and in its becoming it dies returning again to this idea of the dead objects.

Where History Begins, Void Derry
Where History Begins, Void Derry

Duncan Campbell’s, It For Others (2013) is an essay film that examines how we understand certain histories through objects and how we assign value on material goods. The piece takes as its starting point the 1953 film by Alan Resnais and Chris Marker called Statues Also Die, which asserts that colonialism is responsible for the demystification and commericalisation of traditional art from African culture. The film moves from the appropriation of traditional art from Western Africa, to the death of purpose of these objects from the colonial classes from here Campbell moves to popular culture and the construction of historical narratives through images and objects.

Where History Begins, Void Derry
Where History Begins, Void Derry

Kader Attia’s film Reflecting Memory (2016) splices interviews with academics and medical professionals with footage of individuals engaged in solitary pursuits: contemplating nature, sitting in a church pew, and admiring urban monuments. The subject discussed is the phantom limb pain experienced by amputees. This pain is aligned to cultural trauma, the history of colonialism and the appropriation of territories, people and objects and the repairing of the past pains or traumas of colonies. In film theory ‘suture’ refers to the phenomenon by which the mind produces a narrative whole from the fragments combined through cinematic cuts, creating a semblance of totality even when we should know better than to expect one. Attia’s film deftly exposes how the desire to perceive a whole subject can itself operate as an act of erasure.

 

The works reflect on regimes of knowledge both past and present. Questioning perceived notions and casting a critical eye on accepted canons. Where does one position oneself when looking at an artefact, what does it reveal, what does it have in common with other contemporary propositions in the world? In Glissant’s theory of relation, what brings things together is first of all the connection between differences, as they meet one after the other. The basis for which cause ideas, identities and intuitions to meet, revealing to us the common grounds that we share. It is within this commonality that one finds the universal and where history begins.

 

Void would like to thank the Tower Museum for their support in the supply of artefacts for this exhibition and Northbound Breweries for sponsoring the opening night.

 

 

Ali Cherri

The Digger, 2015

Video – 30 min

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Imane Farès

For twenty years, Sultan Zeib Khan has kept watch over a ruined Neolithic necropolis in the Sharjah desert in the United Arab Emirates. Although majestic, the wide–angle shots have no monumentalising intent: the beauty and extent of the site speak for themselves. What is playing out here is the possibility for one man to become part of a landscape that overwhelms him yet seems to need his help. Seen under the silhouette of a rock about to devour him or as a dwarfed gure spade in hand walking from the back of the frame, Sultan curiously busies himself from day to day to prevent the ruins… from falling into ruin.

 

Alan Resnais & Chris Marker

Statues Also Die, 1953

Video – 30 min

Les statues meurent aussi (Statues Also Die) is a film by Alain Resnais, Chris Marker and Ghislain Cloquet that analyses European perceptions of historical African art within colonialism. It speculates on the spiritual properties of African traditional works (from sculptures to masks) and problematizes the Western commercialisation of these pieces.

 

Prime Camille Norment

Temple Bar Gallery + Studios

30 June – 02 September 2017

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Prime, the first solo exhibition in Ireland of the artist Camille Norment. Her work is often site-specific, sculptural with a sonic installation. What is deeply arresting with Norment’s work is her preoccupation with how sound affects the body and how it has the ability to allow one to loose oneself through the act of listening. Sound and listening are unseen, intangible and yet the vibrations can be felt as a bodily sensation, the experiential nature of the work is of prime importance. There is a universality to tone, pitch and repetition which is quite primal. Her research crosses disciplines, exploring the interconnections between sound, myth, taboo and science within the framework of art and history. At TBG+S, Norment addresses the windows in the space as a means to play with the audience – being on display, whilst being an active listener and spectator. The ambient noise from the street collides with the voices in the installation adding to the potency of the piece.

Visitors will enter the gallery filled with the sound of deep, resonant voices that form a pre-lingual polyphonic composition contemplating experience in the contemporary state of the world.  The texture of the voices is akin to a humming, a meditation, a moan, or a chant. Sitting on one of a series of benches, the voices’ vibrations are felt directly through the body – it is as though they are physically communicating with you, drawing you into their sonic and psychic sphere, evoking something primal, visceral, bodily and universal.

This kind of vocalization has been replicated in various cultures around the world from the practice of ‘moaning’ from African American church, to Tibetan monk throat singing, to OM mantra mediation, and beyond. In Ireland and Scotland it would relate to the practice of keening which was vocal lament for the dead. The sound could at once gesture to catharsis, a painful groan, a comforting meditation, or a kind of exalting orgasm. While drawing the body into the physical experience of the sound, Prime creates a constellation of cultural references that speak to a connectedness of sound, voice and the body’s experience.

Camille Norment is an American artist who lives and works in Oslo, Norway. She has exhibited and performed extensively in cultural events and institutions, including MoMA (Museum of Modern Art), New York (2013); The Kitchen, New York (2013); Transformer Station (The Cleveland Museum of Art), Cleveland, OH, USA (2013) and The Museum of Contemporary Art (The National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design), Oslo (2012). In 2015, she represented Norway at the Venice Biennale.

Magnetism

Hazelwood Estate, Sligo

June 28, 2015 – September 25, 2015

 

Siobhan Hapaska, courtesy of Magnetism, Hazelwood Estate, 2015
Siobhan Hapaska, courtesy of Magnetism, Hazelwood Estate, 2015

Hazelwood Estate presents Magnetism, a major contemporary art exhibition in the old Snia/Saehan factory that sits on the peninsula at the historic site of Hazelwood in County Sligo.

Igor Grubic, courtesy of Magnetism, Hazelwood Estate, 2015
Igor Grubic, courtesy of Magnetism, Hazelwood Estate, 2015

Curated by Vaari Claffey MAGNETISM features the work of noted Irish and International artists including Lucy Andrews (UK), Mikala Dwyer (AUS), Igor Grubić (CRO), Siobhan Hapaska (UK), Aleksandra Mir (SWE, USA), Laura Morrison (UK, FIN) and Garrett Phelan (IRL). For more details on the artsits’ work visit our website http://www.hazelwoodhouse.ie/

Aleksandra Mir, Plane Landing, courtesy of Magnetism, Hazelwood Estate, 2015
Aleksandra Mir, Plane Landing, courtesy of Magnetism, Hazelwood Estate, 2015

The exhibition also features a programme of VHS based artworks selected with an international team of researcher/curators entitled REWIND <PLAY> FASTFORWARD and a programme will be made available in exhibition.

Mikala Dwyer, courtesy of Magnetism, Hazelwood Estate, 2015
Mikala Dwyer, courtesy of Magnetism, Hazelwood Estate, 2015

A major contemporary exhibition, MAGNETISM has taken over seven rooms of the old Snia/Saehan factory where the extraordinary scale of the space allows for the exhibition of what could be called “extreme objects”; or large-scale works that populate the immense rooms of the factory. These dynamic sculptural works have a transformative effect on the former industrial spaces – including the huge videotape ‘pancake’ stores and welder’s workshop – through inflatables, lighting, motors, draping and film projection.

Laura Morrison, courtesy of Magnetism, Hazelwood Estate, 2015
Laura Morrison, courtesy of Magnetism, Hazelwood Estate, 2015
Lucy Andrews, courtesy of Magnetism, Hazelwood Estate, 2015
Lucy Andrews, courtesy of Magnetism, Hazelwood Estate, 2015

Hilary Lloyd Woodall

Temple Bar Gallery + Studios

February, 11 – April 1, 2017

27/02/17 Installation view of 'Woodall', an exhibition of work by Hilary Lloyd in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. (Photo: Kasia Kaminska)
27/02/17 Installation view of ‘Woodall’, an exhibition of work by Hilary Lloyd in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. (Photo: Kasia Kaminska)

Hilary Lloyd’s exhibition Woodall is presented as a collaboration between Temple Bar Gallery + Studio’s and PLASTIK Festival of Artists’ Moving Image.

Hilary Lloyd’s work centres on film and video, while also engaging with sculpture, painting, collage and installation. Her films resist the conventional notion of ‘duration’, instead presenting filmic images to be encountered. They often relate to the urban environment, their subject matter veering between the recognisable – a crowded bar, a building, a motorway bridge – and more fleeting or subliminal images, which play with the processes of seeing and interpreting.

27/02/17 Installation view of 'Woodall', an exhibition of work by Hilary Lloyd in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. (Photo: Kasia Kaminska)
27/02/17 Installation view of ‘Woodall’, an exhibition of work by Hilary Lloyd in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. (Photo: Kasia Kaminska)

For Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, Lloyd has constructed a multi-part installation in which film and sculptural elements are interwoven. Central to this installation is a group of new film works in which Lloyd continues to probe the architecture and ambiences of particular places. She integrates sounds and images in ways that challenge typical viewing conventions – sliding from interpretable scenes into ‘abstract’ formulations of colour, shape and light. Through a strategy of juxtaposition, Lloyd shifts between detachment and intimacy, abstraction and reality – offsetting psychedelic backdrops with casual observations of urban life. The films are integrated into a sculptural installation which includes printed fabric hangings, echoing and reframing the videos’ contents. Throughout the installation, the repetition of shapes and motifs provides a rhythmic quality to the work, connecting real-life visions with constructs of digital technology. Lloyd’s film works have a salient beauty and visual restraint, continually informed by an awareness of the mechanisms through which they are displayed.

27/02/17 Installation view of 'Woodall', an exhibition of work by Hilary Lloyd in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. (Photo: Kasia Kaminska)
27/02/17 Installation view of ‘Woodall’, an exhibition of work by Hilary Lloyd in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. (Photo: Kasia Kaminska)

As in previous works, Lloyd responds directly to the architecture of the gallery, energizing and subtly transforming the location. The arrangement of different elements in the installation ¬– projections, posters, fabrics, furniture – invests it with a sculptural quality, while also foregrounding the physical position and movement of the viewer in the space. In this regard, her work harbours a subtle performative element. Lloyd draws the audience through the architecture of the gallery and through the camera’s frame of vision, distilling and repeating her highly-attuned view of the world.

27/02/17 Installation view of 'Woodall', an exhibition of work by Hilary Lloyd in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. (Photo: Kasia Kaminska)
27/02/17 Installation view of ‘Woodall’, an exhibition of work by Hilary Lloyd in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. (Photo: Kasia Kaminska)

Hilary Lloyd lives and works in London. She has exhibited internationally, with solo exhibitions including Blaffer Art Museum, Houston (2016); Robot, Sadie Coles HQ, London (2015); Balfour, Sadie Coles HQ, London (2015); Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Basel (2012, accompanied by a catalogue); Artists Space, New York (2011); Raven Row, London (2010); Tramway, Glasgow (2009); Le Consortium, Dijon (2009); Kunstverein München, Munich (2006); Waiters, Henry Moore Foundation Contemporary Projects, Venice Biennale (2003); Kino der Dekonstruktion, Frankfurter Kunstverein, Frankfurt (2000); and Chisenhale Gallery, London (1999).

27/02/17 Installation view of 'Woodall', an exhibition of work by Hilary Lloyd in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. (Photo: Kasia Kaminska)
27/02/17 Installation view of ‘Woodall’, an exhibition of work by Hilary Lloyd in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. (Photo: Kasia Kaminska)

Lloyd was nominated for the 2011 Turner Prize for her exhibition of 2010 at Raven Row, London. In 2016 she received The Bryan Robertson Trust Award. Forthcoming solo exhibitions include Dorich House Museum, Kingston University, UK; Focal Point, Southend- on-Sea, UK; Greene Naftali, NY, USA and 356 S. Mission Road, L.A., USA. Hilary Lloyd is represented by Galerie Neu, Berlin; Greene Naftali, New York; Sadie Coles HQ, London.

27/02/17 Installation view of 'Woodall', an exhibition of work by Hilary Lloyd in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. (Photo: Kasia Kaminska)
27/02/17 Installation view of ‘Woodall’, an exhibition of work by Hilary Lloyd in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. (Photo: Kasia Kaminska)

Barbara Knezevic Exquisite Tempo Sector

 

Temple Bar Gallery + Studios

November 17, 2016 – January, 27, 2017

Installation Temple Bar Gallery + Studio, courtesy of the artist + Louis Haugh
Installation Temple Bar Gallery + Studio, courtesy of the artist + Louis Haugh

acrylic Perspex, air, ash, auto-poles, bark, beech, blue alabaster, bottled water, cedarwood oil, clamps, cotton candle wick, cypress oil, digital images, earthenware clay, electric light, electrical cords, elm, Fuji crystal archive photographic paper, glaze, heat lamps, Ilford resin-coated photographic paper, Irish sea water, LED television, ‘live surface’ patinated bronze, Monstera deliciosa, polyurethane foam, rapeseed oil, rock salt, sandalwood oil, soil, soya wax, spikenard oil, terracotta clay, tripods, vetiver oil.

Installation Temple Bar Gallery + Studio, courtesy of the artist + Louis Haugh
Installation Temple Bar Gallery + Studio, courtesy of the artist + Louis Haugh

This is a list of the materials present in Exquisite tempo sector. The exhibition is an omnivorous selection of things acting together to call to mind a film set, a photographic shoot, retail and museum displays and other stagings of stuff in the world. These items are arranged with attention to, though not always respecting museological conventions that make visible the hierarchies of value in material culture.

Installation Temple Bar Gallery + Studio, courtesy of the artist + Louis Haugh
Installation Temple Bar Gallery + Studio, courtesy of the artist + Louis Haugh

The force of time is central to this exhibition; the influence of human, material, geological and ecological duration is present throughout. Candle sculptures flicker and ooze and seawater and other liquids evaporate silently. The stems of Monstera deliciosa, the quintessential house-plant, gradually unfurl to reveal tender, pale green leaves that gradually become darker and tougher. These plants count out their own metronomic beat, an inbuilt and primordial rhythm dictated by the influence of light, heat and moisture. Some materials are known only by their absence, present as chemical apparitions in a photogram, characterized as versions of themselves in photographic C-type prints or digitally on an LED screen.

Installation Temple Bar Gallery + Studio, courtesy of the artist + Louis Haugh
Installation Temple Bar Gallery + Studio, courtesy of the artist + Louis Haugh

At times, this display invites a relaxation into the seduction of viewing, an immersion in affect. It is felt in the warm glow of candlelight, in the scent of woody, earthy essential oils, the quasi-healing power of salt lamps and the rustic, matte surfaces of hand-built ceramics. A refusal to this way of being with artworks is provided by the reflective surfaces of clear acrylic plinths and offered by the slick surfaces of high-gloss photographs. The presence of tripods and other ancillary photographic apparatus in the display insist on an awareness of the act of viewing and being with things, and the durational nature of an artistic exhibition.

This exhibition is about the exposure of artworks and matter; to light, viewing, time, human activity and to each other. It is a reflection on the life span of things, and what remains when they seem to be gone.

Installation Temple Bar Gallery + Studio, courtesy of the artist + Louis Haugh
Installation Temple Bar Gallery + Studio, courtesy of the artist + Louis Haugh

Orla Barry Breaking Rainbows

 

 

Temple Bar Gallery + Studios

October 7 – November 5 2016

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Exploring the boundaries of art and life, Breaking Rainbows uses the relationship between wo/man and animal, and the cannibalistic, symbiotic tension between [Orla Barry] the artist and [Orla Barry] the shepherd to reflect on the primal, poetic and unpredictable bond we have with the natural world. Presented as a live performance and video installation, Barry’s new work is a fascinating journey into the land of shepherding through the lens of ‘doing’ rather than ‘observing’ the job at hand. The tour will begin in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios as part of Dublin Theatre Festival, running from September 29th to November 5th 2016.

 

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Endearing, humorous and challenging, Breaking Rainbows reflects on both our interdependence and disconnection from the natural environment. Made up of a series of vignettes, Barry’s new work brings us into a journey through time, conceptualisations and effects: from the realms of sheep farming traditions, ancient Greek shepherd’s singing competitions, contemporary consumerism and gender roles, to the intimate relationship of caring for a sheep about to give birth.

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Interweaving live performance, video, a 300 kg pile of wool produced on Barry’s farm in 2015, and an aural landscape which touches many different forms of speech, Breaking Rainbows is congruous with Orla Barry’s multidisciplinary aesthetic. However, as in her most recent work, Mountain, it also marks a new step in her trajectory by introducing chance procedures and a collaborative approach to the development of the texts. This results in the stories being reinvented and reshaped, defying notions of ownership, authorship and authenticity, and thus also reflecting on the nature of oral storytelling as transferred throughout generations. This is played out in an unpredictable dramaturgy in which no performance or experience of the installation is the same.

Orla Barry is both visual artist and shepherd. She lived in Brussels for sixteen years and now runs a flock of pedigree Lleyn sheep in rural Wexford. A leitmotif running through her recent work is the human disconnection from the natural environment. Barry writes, and makes performances, video and sound installations. She has shown work at The Irish Museum of Modern Art, SMAK and Tate Modern, amongst others, as well as taking part in Manifesta 2.

This is work is a work of fiction. An exaggerated story. A cacophony of voices and words. Names, characters, places, events and incidents are the products of Orla Barry’s imagination and are used in a fictitious manner. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead is purely coincidental.

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Written and directed by Orla Barry | with the collaboration of Einat Tuchman, Derrick Devine|assistant director Noelia Ruiz | dop Luca Rocchini |sound Michael Lemass | edit Simon Arazi| colour correction Michael Higgins |technical assistance John Beattie & Anthony Butler | fabric design Oonagh Young & Orla Barry

Commissioned and produced by Wexford Arts Centre, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios | co-production Kaaitheater, ARGOS centre for art and media, Crawford Art Gallery| funded by Arts Council of Ireland | support Dublin Theatre Festival, Midsummer Festival Cork, Opera Festival Wexford, IMMA’s Residency Program

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